J.D./M.S.L.S. or J.D./M.S.I.S. Program Structure

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Admission

Admission to the dual degree programs will require that applicants be admitted both to the Law School and to a graduate program at SILS. Each school will review the applicants separately. University regulations do not allow students to be concurrently enrolled in more than one program. Therefore, once a student is admitted to both schools independently (and thus, in effect, admitted into the dual degree program), one of the admissions must be deferred for a year. The American Bar Association standards for programs of legal education prohibit law schools from granting law school credit for courses taken prior to matriculation in the law school.[1] For academic credits awarded in a SILS graduate program to count towards the law degree, the credits must be earned after the candidate has been admitted to the Law School.

A student in these dual degree programs will normally matriculate in Law and defer enrollment at SILS for a year. Regardless of which program the student first commences, the other program must be informed by the student, in writing, that the candidate is entering the dual degree program and needs to defer admission to it for a year. This letter of request should be copied to both the second program and to the Graduate School, as it will be the formal record of entry into the dual degree program.

In some cases, students might enter one program and learn of, or gain interest in, the dual degree program during their first year. In such cases, the matriculated student would apply for admission into the other program, informing the registrar and the coordinator in both programs at the time of application. Students in the first year of a SILS graduate program may apply for admission to the Law School. However, in keeping with the ABA standards for law schools noted above, SILS credits earned prior to matriculation in the Law School will not be counted towards the dual degree.

If a student becomes academically ineligible or otherwise terminates enrollment in the University and subsequently seeks readmission, each program will determine whether to recommend readmission. Should one of the programs not recommend readmission, the student will no longer be part of the dual degree program.

Academic Requirements

No substantive changes in core courses or degree requirements for Law or SILS graduates are imposed by the program. Modifications in the Law program requirements include the substitution of certain courses, noted below, and the acceptance of twelve SILS credit hours towards the Law degree. Modifications in SILS program requirements include the substitution of certain courses noted below, and the acceptance of nine Law credit hours towards a SILS graduate degree.

Dual degree students will begin by taking all of the required first year Law courses. The first summer and the second year will consist primarily of SILS core courses, with a small number of approved Law electives. The third year will reverse this with matriculation in the Law School and the fourth year will be divided between both programs.

In order to be awarded the J.D. and the M.S.L.S. or the M.S.I.S., the student must complete all core requirements of each degree program. No less than 74 credit hours will be from Law courses and no less 39 credit hours will be from graduate courses at SILS. Both degrees can be completed in a total of 113 semester hours. If a student drops out of a Law and SILS dual degree program, the student will not be awarded either degree unless all requirements are met for each program on its own. That is, to earn a J.D. the candidate must complete 86 credit hours, at least 83 of which must be courses taught at the Law School.

Advising

The student will consult with the dual degree coordinators in both schools in order to map out a general curricular and matriculation strategy. Students will have faculty advisers in each program and will be encouraged to participate in seminars, social activities, and professional development activities in both schools. The designated faculty for the Law School will work with students in the J.D./M.S.L.S. program. The designated faculty adviser for SILS will work with students in the J.D./M.S.L.S. and the J.D./M.S.I.S. programs. Faculty advisers will meet at least once a year with all students enrolled in the programs and at least once a semester with individual students. In order to ensure that dual degree students are able to enroll in required courses and have a choice of electives, faculty advisers and program coordinators will formalize a system of communication between the two schools.

Curriculum

Law

First year law courses are prescribed. They cover fundamental subjects in substance and procedure and introduce students to legal research and writing. Second year courses are designed to broaden a student's base of substantive knowledge and include enrollment in a required professional responsibility course. Law students are also required to complete two writing experience courses after the first year. At least one of those courses must be designated as a "rigorous writing experience" by the Law School. The third year courses prepare a student for transition into the practice of law by offering training in practical skills.

The School of Law reserves the right to change rules and requirements governing instruction and graduation and to change any other regulations affecting the student body. Any changes apply to prospective students and, when so provided, to students already matriculated. Law requisites listed in this document are in addition to those currently in place. All dual degree candidates are subject to the policies and procedures of the School of Law Catalog, also known as The Record.

Courses required for a J.D.:

  • LAW 201 Civil Procedure
  • LAW 204 Contracts
  • LAW 205 Criminal Law
  • LAW 207 Property
  • LAW 209 Torts
  • LAW 234 Constitutional Law
  • LAW 266 Professional Responsibility
  • LAW 295 Research, Writing, & Advocacy
  • LAW 296 Research, Writing, & Advocacy II
  • LAW XXX A course designated as a writing experience and
  • LAW XXX A course designated as a rigorous writing experience

Additional requirements for the dual degree candidate:

  • LAW 210 Copyright
  • LAW 265 Intellectual Property Law
  • LAW 267 Advanced Legal Research or Advanced Legal Research & Writing
  • LAW 357 Cyberspace Law Seminar

SILS

The master of science in library science and the master of science in information science programs prepare students for professional employment in library service and the information industry. Research and publishing activities are highly encouraged. The requirements listed in this proposal supplement the graduate requirements in the SILS catalog. All dual degree candidates are subject to the policies and procedures in place at SILS.

M.S.L.S.

This program prepares students for professional employment in library and information services. The degree is designed to educate students for work involving the collection, organization, storage, and retrieval of recorded information. Analysis and design skills are emphasized. Students are prepared for careers in areas such as library administration, archives and manuscript collection management, documents, cataloging, public and reference services, acquisitions and collection management. The curriculum is designed around five functional areas: design and evaluation, organization, collection and retrieval, information-related behavior and management.

Course required for a M.S.L.S.:

  • INLS 461 Information Tools
  • INLS 501 Information Resources and Services
  • INLS 585 Management for Information Professionals
  • INLS 520 Organization of materials
  • INLS 513 Resource selection and Evaluation
  • INLS 500 Human Information Interactions
  • INLS 780 Research Methods
  • INLS 992 Master's Paper (for credits to count toward the J.D., the paper must deal with a legal topic for libraries.)

Additional requirements for the dual degree candidate:

  • INLS 584 Information Ethics
  • INLS 707 Government Documents
  • INLS 708 Law Libraries and Legal Information
  • INLS 795 Professional Field Experience (for credits to count towards the J.D., the field experience must be in a law library and under the supervision of a qualified law librarian.)

M.S.I.S.

The master of science in information science program is designed to prepare students to contribute to the design, development, and maintenance of information systems and networks; to provide leadership in the development of new technologies and new applications relating to the delivery of information to users; and to demonstrate a theoretical knowledge of information science, including the theory of information storage and retrieval, systems science, and social, political, and ethical implications of information systems.

Within this degree, students may develop their own specializations through their choice of courses. This degree program is intended to prepare students for careers focusing on the design, implementation, evaluation, and administration of a wide variety of information systems including databases, networks, multimedia, the World Wide Web, instructional technologies, and other emerging technologies.

Designed around five functional areas, the curriculum of the master's degree of science in information science includes courses in organization, collection and retrieval, information-related behavior, design and evaluation, and management. Elective courses build upon the required courses in each of these areas and allow students to concentrate their studies.

Courses required for a M.S.I.S.:

  • INLS 461 Information Tools
  • INLS 585 Management for Information Professionals
  • INLS 520 Organization of Information
  • INLS 582 Systems Analysis
  • INLS 509 Information Retrieval
  • INLS 500 Human Information Interactions
  • INLS 780 Research Methods
  • INLS 992 Master's Paper (for credits to count towards the J.D., the paper must be on a legal topic)

Additional requirements for the dual degree candidate:

  • INLS 584 Information Ethics
  • INLS 795 Professional Field Experience (for credits to count towards the J.D., the experience must be in a legal institution and under the supervision of a qualified legal professional

SHARED CREDIT COURSES

Law will apply up to 12 SILS course credits towards the J.D.
These credits may be drawn from:

  • INLS 584 Information Ethics
  • INLS 707 Government Documents
  • INLS 708 Law Libraries and Legal Information
  • INLS 795 Professional Field Experience (subject to law related focus, noted above)
  • INLS 992 Master's Paper (subject to law related focus, noted above)

SILS will accept up to 9 Law course credits towards the M.S.L.S. or the M.S.I.S. The credits may be drawn from:

  • LAW 210 Copyright
  • LAW 265 Intellectual Property Law
  • LAW 357 Cyberspace Law

Both Law and SILS retain the right to revise course requirements and shared credit course designations. Any such revisions will be done in consultation with the faculty advisers for each program.


[1] See ABA Standard 304



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